scallywagsandseamonsters:

Whiskey is the life of man,

Whiskey, Johnny!

O, whiskey is the life of man,

Whiskey for my Johnny O!


O, I drink whiskey when I can

Whiskey, Johnny!

I drink whiskey from an old tin can,

Whiskey for my Johnny O!


Whiskey gave me a broken nose!

Whiskey, Johnny!

Whiskey made me pawn my clothes,

Whiskey for me Johnny O!


Whiskey drove me around Cape Horn.

Whiskey, Johnny!

It was many a month when I was gone,

Whiskey for my Johnny O!


I thought I heard the old man say;

Whiskey, Johnny!

I’ll treat my crew in a decent way,

Whiskey for my Johnny O!


A glass of grog for every man!

Whiskey, Johnny!

And a bottle for the chanteyman.

Whiskey for my Johnny O!

scallywagsandseamonsters:

Randy Dandy O

Now we are ready to sail for the Horn,

Weigh hey, roll and go!

Our boots and our clothes, boys, are all in the pawn,

To be rollicking randy dandy-O!


(Chorus)

Heave a pawl, O heave away!

Weigh hey, roll and go!

The anchor’s on board and the cable’s all stored,

To be rollicking randy dandy-O!


Soon we’ll be warping her out through the locks,

Weigh hey, roll and go!

Where the pretty young girls all come down in their frocks,

To be rollicking randy dandy-O!


(Chorus)


Come breast the bars, bullies, heave her away,

Weigh hey, roll and go! .

Soon well be rolling her down through the Bay,

To be rollicking randy dandy-O!

proletarianpekingese:

[Illustration of Captain Hook in a sword fight with Peter Pan on the deck of Hook’s brig, Jolly Roger, as the Lost Boys look on in amazement.] 
Disabled Characters: Captain James Hook, Peter Pan; or the Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up.

“Of course Neverland had been make-believe in those days; but it was real now, and there were no night-lights, and it was getting darker every moment, and where was Nana?” 

Little is known of Captain Hook - not even his name. J.M. Barrie, the play’s author, writes in the novel, “Hook was not his true name. To reveal who he really was would - even at this date - set the country in a blaze”, only revealing that Peter Pan began their rivalry by feeding Hook’s hand to the crocodile.
While he is often shown wearing elaborate wigs, with bushy eyebrows and a thick beard, Hook is described in the book as being very handsome, with “an elegance of…diction - even when swearing”. He uses his hook not only as a weapon, but to hold and smoke two cigars at once.
Despite being known as a villain, Barrie considered Hook’s thirst for blood and brash attitude as characteristics of being a magnificent pirate, and “not wholly unheroic”, considering Peter Pan closer to the idea of a villain. It is also said that Barrie acknowledged the direct correlations between his play and Herman Melville’s novel, Moby Dick; Hook shares many of the same characteristics with Ahab, particularly an obsession with the animal that took their limbs.

proletarianpekingese:

[Illustration of Captain Hook in a sword fight with Peter Pan on the deck of Hook’s brig, Jolly Roger, as the Lost Boys look on in amazement.] 

Disabled Characters: Captain James Hook, Peter Pan; or the Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up.

“Of course Neverland had been make-believe in those days; but it was real now, and there were no night-lights, and it was getting darker every moment, and where was Nana?” 

Little is known of Captain Hook - not even his name. J.M. Barrie, the play’s author, writes in the novel, “Hook was not his true name. To reveal who he really was would - even at this date - set the country in a blaze”, only revealing that Peter Pan began their rivalry by feeding Hook’s hand to the crocodile.

While he is often shown wearing elaborate wigs, with bushy eyebrows and a thick beard, Hook is described in the book as being very handsome, with “an elegance of…diction - even when swearing”. He uses his hook not only as a weapon, but to hold and smoke two cigars at once.

Despite being known as a villain, Barrie considered Hook’s thirst for blood and brash attitude as characteristics of being a magnificent pirate, and “not wholly unheroic”, considering Peter Pan closer to the idea of a villain. It is also said that Barrie acknowledged the direct correlations between his play and Herman Melville’s novel, Moby Dick; Hook shares many of the same characteristics with Ahab, particularly an obsession with the animal that took their limbs.

Reblogged from scallywagsandseamonsters